Skip to Content

How to Make Ginger Beer

How to make homemade ginger beer, including photos and a video! This simply recipe is lower in sugar than store-bought ginger beer, contains vitamins and probiotics, and is a healthier alternative to most carbonated drinks. 

 

Ginger beer is all the rage right now, and for a very good reason.

The sweet and spicy beverage is tasty by itself and adds pep to all sorts of cocktails and mocktails. If you’re anything like me, you could add ginger beer to all of your cocktails from now until doomsday.

Most of us think of ginger beer in the context of the Dark n’ Stormy or Moscow Mule and other cocktails that involve the brew.  But did you know you can make a stellar homemade ginger ale at home, and not only is it easy, but it’s also great for you?

A bottle and two glasses of ginger beer inside of a serving tray with a lemon.

Because we like to do things in the legit-est of ways, we’re going to put on our DIY cap and learn how to make fermented ginger beer at home.

And it’s going to be healthier than the store-bought version, because that’s the way we roll.

Ingredients for homemade ginger soda. Fresh ginger root and lemons

Types of Homemade Ginger Beer Recipes:

There are several ways to make ginger beer.

Method #1: Most people make a simple syrup using ginger, sugar, and water, and then combine the simple syrup with soda water. While this is the least time consuming way of making ginger beer, and definitely comes out tasting great, we can take it a step farther by fermenting ginger beer into a healthful drink.

Method #2: The old fashioned way uses a “ginger bug” or “ginger starter,” which is ginger that has fermented in sugar and water to the point that its natural enzymes and probiotics are released.

Once a ginger bug is formed, it is then brewed into a batch of ginger brew, which results in a probiotic-rich effervescent drink. This method of making ginger beer takes between 4 and 6 weeks, and is the method I describe in my cookbook, Delicious Probiotic Drinks.

I have also posted a tutorial on How to Make Probiotic Ginger Beer on this site for real ginger beer. Check it out if you’re looking for a beverage with a higher concentration of probiotics.

It is also an alcoholic ginger beer that has a tiny amount of alcohol but can be fermented in such a way that increases the alcohol content.

Method #3 (this recipe): The method I’m sharing in this post uses regular baker’s yeast. The yeast consumes the sugar as it reproduces, which means that while the finished product tastes sweet, it is actually very low in sugar.

Which Type of Ginger Beer To Make:

The quickest way is Method #1 listed above, which will require a recipe outside of this blog post.

Whether you choose to make this easy ginger beer recipe laid out in this post or my probiotic ginger beer is a matter of personal preference (and time).

For those of us who want ginger beer quickly, this easy version only takes 3 days from start to finish.

It still has health benefits from the yeast, but because it is not fermented for as long as the authentic version, it isn’t as probiotic-rich.

As with any fermentation process, a small amount of alcohol results. The alcohol content in this ginger beer is very low, almost non-existent. Still, if you need to avoid alcohol, it is best to be safe and stick with a non-alcoholic ginger beer.

Ingredients Needed for Ginger Beer:

All it takes is fresh grated organic ginger, cream of tartar, lemon juice, active dry yeast, and cold water. 

You can replace the lemon juice with lime juice if you’d like. I always go with organic fresh ginger root because it contains plenty of natural bacteria and natural yeasts for the best ginger beer.

Some people add brewer’s yeast (beer yeast) or champagne yeast to this recipe to boost the activity and alcohol content. I don’t personally have experience with either one so can’t offer advice on how much to use or how to employ it, but if you’re interested in stepping up your brew, they are worth looking into!

I have also heard some people use sourdough starter to make ginger beer, but I have no experience with this either.

Wooden serving tray with one bottle and two glasses of ginger beer.

 

Two full glasses of ginger soda with lemon slices and a bottle in the background

HEALTH BENEFITS OF GINGER:

Ginger is a root, and has been used as a natural remedy for upset stomach and nausea across many civilizations for hundreds of years.

It is a natural anti-inflammatory and digestive aid.

Studies show fresh ginger prevents and fights several types of cancer cells including breast, colon, ovarian, prostate, and lung cancer.

Ginger is also known for cleansing the body of toxic chemicals, as it is full of antioxidants. When fermented, ginger releases enzymes and probiotics, which help maintain healthy gut microflora.

How to Make Ginger Beer:

Process shot for the steps to make ginger beer

  1. Peel and grate the fresh ginger using a box grater. You want about 1/4 cup of grated ginger.
  2. Add the cream of tartar (1/2 teaspoon), lemon juice (1/4 cup), and ginger to a large pot.
  3. Add 4 cups of water, and bring the mixture to a full boil.
  4. Turn the heat down to medium, add the sugar and stir until all of the sugar is dissolved.
  5. Add the rest of the cold water to the pot (5 cups) and allow it to cool to around 75 degrees Fahrenheit (23 degrees Celsius). Add the yeast (1 teaspoon), stir well.
  6. Cover the pot with a kitchen towel and place in a warm, dark part of your house for 3 hours. The mixture should smell gingery and yeasty!
  7. Using a fine strainer, coffee filter, or a fine-mesh sieve, strain the liquid into a large pitcher to remove all the bits of ginger.
  8. Pour this strain mixture into a clean 2-liter plastic bottle. Empty soda water bottles work perfectly, and you can also use 2 one-liter bottles. Do not fill up the bottles all the way because the fermentation will yield carbon dioxide.

Place the plastic soda bottles in a dark place (ideally a warm room or warm place) for a couple of days. One to three times a day, carefully loosen the caps to relieve some of the pressure (without opening the bottles all the way).

The drink becomes very pressurized and fizzy, so skipping this step could result in a ginger beer bottle explosion. True story. Be very careful in this process and do not point the bottles at anyone’s (or your own face).

After your brew has finished fermenting, you can either add fruit, simple syrup, juice, or liquor to it to create a customized treat, or drink it as is.

If you choose to bottle the ginger beer in glass bottles, allow the ginger beer to lose much of its fizz prior to bottling, as it will continue to carbonate in the bottles.

This could result in them exploding if there is too much pressure.

Horizontal image of two glasses of homemade ginger beer with lemon slices

Important Notes:

During fermentation, DO NOT use glass bottles, because the glass can explode under pressure (yes, it builds up that much pressure!), be sure to use plastic bottles with screw tops, as noted in the recipe, so that you can relieve pressure during fermentation.

After 24 hours, you will notice yeast colonies on top of the liquid and settled at the bottom. This is normal!

Once the ginger beer has finished fermenting, glass bottles may be used for bottling and storing.

You must be very careful when opening the bottles because the beverage will still be very carbonated. Always point glass bottles away from your face or anyone else’s face while opening.

The longer you allow the brew to ferment, the more sugar will be metabolized by the yeast, resulting in a less sweet, drier beverage.

If you prefer a sweeter beverage, consider fermenting the ginger beer for one to two days only or simply start with more sugar (about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups instead of 1 cup) than you need.

For spicy ginger beer, start out with double the amount of ginger for a kick. Make your own ginger beer based on your personal taste!

I recommend storing finished ginger beer in the refrigerator and always away from direct sunlight.

Depending on the time of year and the room temperature, the brew may take more or less time to ferment. If the room is particularly cool, it could take an extra day or two to finish fermenting, whereas if it very warm, it could take less than 48 hours.

Rustic wooden serving crate with 8 bottles of homemade ginger beer

While I was writing my cookbook, Delicious Probiotic Drinks, I had a great deal of fun with the ginger beer section – for me the challenge of making authentic ginger beer was even more interesting than brewing the perfect batch of kombucha.

Although this fermented drink takes the longest to brew out of all the fermented drinks in the book, once it finishes fermenting, it is one of the tastiest and spunkiest probiotic drinks.

To try out the super duper authentic version of homemade ginger beer, be sure to get your paws on my book!

Now go forth and ferment you some ginger juice.

My cookbook, Paleo Power Bowls, is now available! CLICK HERE to check it out, and thank you for your support!

If you make this ginger beer recipe, please feel free to share a photo and tag @The.Roasted.Root on Instagram!

A bottle and two glasses of ginger beer inside of a serving tray with a lemon.

How to Make Ginger Beer

Yield: 2 Liters
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

An easy recipe for homemade Ginger Beer that is fizzy with marvelous tang and spice. A healthier alternative to soda!

Ingredients

  • 9 cups spring or well water
  • ½ teaspoon cream of tartar*
  • 1/3 cup fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice**
  • 1 cup granulated cane sugar***
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast****

You Also Need:

  • 1 (2-liter) plastic bottle with screw top ., a soda water bottle that has been carefully cleaned works great
  • A medium to large sized pot for heating water

Instructions

1. Add the cream of tartar, lemon juice and fresh grated ginger to a large pot along with 4 cups of the water. Bring to a full boil.

Cream of tartar, lemon juice and fresh grated ginger in a saucepan

2. Turn the heat down to medium, add the sugar and stir until all of the sugar is dissolved.

3. Add the rest of the (cold) water to the pot and allow it to cool to around 75 degrees F (23 degrees C). Stir in the yeast, stir and cover the pot with a kitchen towel. Place pot in a dark place for 3 hours.

Add the yeast to the lukewarm mixture and stir

4. Using a fine strainer, strain the liquid into a pitcher to remove all the bits of ginger.

Strain out the ginger flesh

5. Pour the brew into one clean 2-liter plastic bottle (or two 1-liter bottles) but do not fill up the bottle all the way because the fermentation will yield carbon dioxide, causing gases to build in the bottle - you will need to give the liquid some room to build the gas. Place the bottles in a dark, warm room for 2 to 3 days (two days if you want a sweeter ginger beer, and 3 days if you prefer a drier ginger beer).

Pour the ginger beer into a 2 liter plastic bottle

6. Once to three times a day, carefully loosen the caps to relieve some of the pressure (without opening the bottles all the way). Be very careful in this process and do not point the bottles at anyone’s (or your own face). After the ginger beer has finished brewing, store it in the refrigerator to chill. This will also slow the fermentation process.

7. Pour in a glass and enjoy as is, or add a splash of rum and lime juice for a Dark n' Stormy. Ginger beer keeps for 10 days - be sure to store in air-tight bottles in your refrigerator.

Notes

*You can replace the cream of tarter with 1 teaspoon of baking powder.

**I used a meyer lemon - it only took one for 1/4 cup of juice.

***If you don't do cane sugar, you can use coconut sugar.

****Yup, this is the same yeast you use for baking bread. After your brew is finished fermenting, you can either add fruit, simple syrup, juice, or liquor to it to create a customized treat, or drink it as is. If you choose to bottle the ginger beer in glass bottles, allow the ginger beer to lose much of its fizz prior to bottling, as it will continue to carbonate in the bottles, which could result in them exploding if there is too much pressure.

Nutrition Information
Yield 2 Serving Size 12 ounces
Amount Per Serving Calories 40Unsaturated Fat 0gCarbohydrates 10gSugar 7g
Refreshing beverages for a warm day that takes little time!

Collage for pinterest on how to make homemade ginger beer

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Soraya

Thursday 30th of December 2021

This worked incredibly well! Thank you! I tried the ginger starter but failed 😅 so super glad this worked. I did find that it went pretty flat when I transferred it to another bottle and put it in the fridge. Any tips?

Scott

Saturday 13th of November 2021

Hello! I've made this recipe a few times and love it, but this time it's overwhelmed with the cream of tartar taste. Is it possible to make it without it? I'm really looking for a heavy ginger forward flavour.

Thanks in advance!

Julia

Sunday 14th of November 2021

Hi Scott,

Are you sure it's the cream of tarter you're tasting? It has more of a creamy, neutral flavor on its own, which is pretty well masked by the ginger. Could it be the yeast that you don't like? The cream of tarter can be omitting, but the yeast cannot. Hope that helps!! xo

Wendy

Friday 15th of October 2021

Thank you for the update, ilove ginger beer, ken you send me video how too make ginger beer, that you

Linda

Friday 7th of May 2021

Hi Can I use honey instead of sugar?

Karim Currimbhoy

Friday 19th of February 2021

i have started making wine at home and my first effort was ginger wine. it came out well. i am making a second batch now with wine yeast. will definately try this ginger beer. i live in the south of india and the summers are very hot and sultry here. this drink will go very well here :)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to Recipe