How to Spiralize Butternut Squash

Learn how to spiralize butternut squash in order to make delicious gluten-free pasta recipes.

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

Remember that phase we went through together with our Spirelli? We made this, that, and the other thing out of veggie noodles. For a while there, life was looking like one big bowl of gluten-free vegetable pasta. We may have shared a Lady and the Tramp moment or two.

I’ve got some news for you…

We have graduated.

Although I still use and love my spirelli, I have been wanting to noodle-ize the larger vegetables in life. Let’s face it – a hand-held spirelli can noodle the crap out of a zucchini, but it can do no damage to a butternut squash. I follow the blog, Inspiralized, where Ali posts mouth-watering recipes using a spiralizer. Inspired by all the healthy, hearty meals you can make out of vegetable noodles, I went ahead and purchased the Paderno Spiral Vegetable Slicer, knowing it’s more suitable for the larger vegetables.

Upon examining the spiralizer and sizing up my butternut squash, I did a little head scratching. I realized this would be a tough nut to crack <- get it? Nut? Butternut. Buh-dum-ching.  And it dawned on me that if I was giving the butternut the sideways glance, not knowing how or where to start the spiralization,  many folks would probably have the same problem. I figured I’d share a little tutorial so that we can whip up butternut squash noodles to our heart’s delight.

How to Spiralize Butternut Squash

First, buy a large butternut squash that is more cylandrical than round..you want the long part to be as long and straight as possible.

Grab hold of your butternut squash. Using a sharp knife, carefully chop the bottom bulbous part off and save it for your future butternut squash needs. We aren’t going to spiralize the rounded end because it contains seeds and funky innards that don’t do well for spiralization.

 How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

Peel the butternut squash using a julienne peeler or potato peeler. There is another white layer underneath the tough cream colored skin that needs to be peeled too. I simply peeled the squash twice with my potato peeler. This is TEE-DEE-OUS, but it’s worth the tedium, I promise!

 How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

Now chop the long part in half so that your butternut chunks are about 3 to 4 inches each.

 How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

Insert your blade of choice into your spiralizer.

 How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

Place one of the butternut chunks firmly in the corer. Make sure your spiralizer is sitting firmly (suctioned) to a flat surface. Crank the lever to spiralize noodles.

 How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash @roastedroot

Seperate the noodles using your hands – it makes the cooking process easier. Once you’ve noodled the squash, you can make all sorts of gluten-free “pasta” recipes. Cooking the noodles takes roughly 12 to 15 minutes over medium heat in a skillet. I’ve read you can also roast the noodles in the oven by lightly coating them with oil and baking at 400 degrees for 5 to 8 minutes.

And that’s it, folks! Let there be noodles! Stay tuned for a tremendously awesome butternut squash pasta recipe.

Check out Inspiralized for another great tutorial on How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash.

What you’ll need for all the spiralizing:

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Comments

    1. Julia Post author

      Santa didn’t come through for me, either, so I got myself the spiralizer for xmas. Gotta love functional gifts that you give to yourself 😉

  1. Julie

    I need a better spiralizer (or however you spell that). Mine is one I got at BB&B and I didn’t pay a fortune for it. Meanwhile, I have a butternut squash begging to be made into spirals.

    1. Julia Post author

      The hand-held ones are definitely convenient for zucchini and carrots, but I’m loving the Paderno…I have a feeling it’s going to have a permanent spot on my counter.

    1. Julia Post author

      Oh heck yeah, you’ll love the Paderno. You can make super thick and medium-thick noodles, and the noodles turn out long and un-broken. Pretty psyched about my new purchase! I wash it by hand, and it’s super easy to clean!!

  2. Susan

    I love my Paderno spiralizer. Don’t normally invest in gadgets, but this one is well worth it. I’m also a follower of Inspiralized, and enjoy Ali’s tutorials and recipes, but it’s good to have another take on the tutorials.

    1. Julia Post author

      Wahoo! I’m so glad you agree that the Paderno is a great tool to have. It has already taken my veggie noodling to the next level. And yup, that Ali really knows what she’s talking about!!

  3. kate / vegukate

    YES! I too upgraded my spiralizer (to this very same one!) and I’ve been spiralizing everything in my path. I’ve been wanting to make some squashy noodles and now I know just how! Thank you ! 🙂

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